• Advanced Placement

    The AP program offers two English courses that are designed to provide high school students to engage in a typical college or university introductory-level English course.

     AP Language and Composition focuses on rhetorical analysis of nonfiction texts and development and revision of well-reasoned, evidence-based analytic and argumentative writing.

    AP Literature and Composition focuses on reading, analyzing, and writing about imaginative literature (fiction, poetry, drama) from various time periods.

    AP Physics 1 is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physic course. In this course, students cultivate their understanding of Physics through inquiry-based investigations as they explore kinematics, dynamics, circular motion and gravitation, energy, momentum, simple harmonic motion, torque and rotational motion, electric charge and electric force, DC circuits, and mechanical waves and sound.

    AP European History is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester introductory college or university European history course.  Students will investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in four historical periods from approximately 1450 to the present.  Through the six themes that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places, students develop and use the same skills, practices, and methods employed by historians which include analyzing primary and secondary sources, developing historical arguments, and making historical comparisons.

    AP U.S. History is designed to be the equivalent of a two-semester introductory college or university U.S. History course.  Students will investigate significant events, individuals, developments, and processes in nine historical periods from approximately 1491 to the present.  Through the seven themes that students explore throughout the course in order to make connections among historical developments in different times and places, students develop and use the same skills, practices, and methods employed by historians which include analyzing primary and secondary sources, developing historical arguments, and making historical comparisons.

    AP Calculus AB is equivalent to that of a first-semester college calculus course.  The course is designed to develop mathematical knowledge conceptually, guiding students to connect topics and representations and to apply strategies and techniques to accurately solve diverse types of problems.  The goal of AP Calculus is to build enduring mathematical understanding which requires students to understand the why and how of mathematics in addition to mastering the necessary procedures and skills.