Back to Family Challenge

Back to Family Challenge

  • Week 10

    Everyone has heard the Golden Rule: “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.” It’s one of those basic rules that parents tell their kids to follow. But we may be showing our kids something different. The truth is that to live the Golden Rule, we must take positive risks with people who indeed may ignore or turn on us. But a person’s response does not change that when we choose to treat him or her well, we have followed the Rule rightly. Have a talk with your child about why it is important to follow the Golden Rule while taking a family walk together.

    Week 9

    If we are modeling the behavior we expect, maintaining our parental authority, and disciplining when our children make mistakes, we are going to be in pretty good shape. Clearly communicate to your children what you expect. When you discipline them, be sure they understand the reason for the punishment. Communication is always key to mutual respect, so keep the lines open. Stay calm, always reinforce your love for them, and reward great behavior just as much as you discipline the negative. Plan a family game night this week and enjoy their favorite board game together.

    Week 8

    Nip disrespect in the bud at an early age. Don’t ignore the moments of disrespect that surely will occur, whether at home, at school, or in public. When my kids were younger, they knew they’d better keep it together in public or discipline would come. My oldest challenged this often, and I’d look at her and ask, “Have you lost your mind?” She understood by multiple examples that when I said those words, she would lose something she cared about if she didn’t stop. Always apply discipline to undesired behavior and do so in an incremental manner. The first time, maybe they lose a favorite stuffed animal for an hour. The second time, it’s gone for the day. Third time? That’s up to your discretion. Never ignore these highly teachable moments. This week, visit the park, beach, or boardwalk for a walk together and ask them what RESPECT means to them and what respectable behavior looks like for a child their age.

    Week 7

    I love hanging out with my children. I love the inside jokes, laughs, and good times that best friends would have, but my kids are not my friends. A big line of respect runs through our relationship that is not to be crossed. We should teach our kids to say thank you, please, yes sir, and no ma’am. We should never allow our kids to speak with malice or disrespect to their parents or any adult figure in their world. It’s great to have close bonds with your kids but maintain your authority at all times. If you are able, play a game of catch or throw the frisbee with them one afternoon this week. Focus on them.

    Week 6

    We want our children to be respectful, but are we living what we are preaching? Reflect on your actions and carefully consider what the kids are absorbing. Do they see you obeying traffic laws? Do you pay your taxes? Are you respectful to the employees of their school, your neighbors, civil servants, or even the worker at the drive-thru window? In the chain of command, everything starts at the top, with you. What do your children see? We must model the expected behavior. Plan a family meal night and over the course of dinner, ask your child how they would handle all their classmates laughing at another child that got a wrong answer on their classwork.

    Week 5

    Children learn by example. If you are setting a good example for them by spending quality time together, they are more likely to adopt those behaviors in other relationships in their lives. Simple things like playing games together will help them understand more about interacting with others as well as teach them things like sharing and kindness. Most importantly, family time means you can just have fun and enjoy each others company

    Week 4

    Children and adolescents who spend more time with their parents are less likely to get involved in risky behavior. According to studies done by the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse via Arizona State University, teens who have infrequent family dinners are twice as likely to use tobacco, nearly twice as likely to use alcohol and one and a half times more likely to use marijuana. Children who frequently eat with their families also usually have improved dietary intake compared to those who don’t eat as often with family members.

    Week 3

    Spending time helping your children with schoolwork or reading together, especially in their early years, will foster an environment that values academics. If your child feels comfortable coming to you with schoolwork, they are more likely to perform better academically.

    Week 2

    Spending time helping your children with schoolwork or reading together, especially in their early years, will foster an environment that values academics. If your child feels comfortable coming to you with schoolwork, they are more likely to perform better academically.

    Week 1

    When you spend time with your children you are fostering an environment for open communication. Good communication is important for your children to feel comfortable with talking to you about anything. Simply asking your child how their day has gone can make a big difference.