Mrs. Mckeivier's Weekly Agenda Science and Stem classes

  • 8th Grade Science       April 8th-12th

    Evolutionary History Unit

    Monday-  Chapter 3-Lesson 3.1 workbook pages 79-85

    Tuesday: Chapter 3 Lesson 3.2 workbook

    pages 87-91

    Wednesday: Chapter 3 Lesson 3.3 workbook 

    pages 93-100

    Thursday:  Test Review-Power point and notes

    Friday: End of Unit Test for Evolutionary History

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  • test

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  • Leap Testing Starts on April 23rd

    Robotics classes will be reviewing concepts from past chapters 7,8, and 9

    6th Grade Science

    April 8th-12th
    Monday: Solar Eclipse facts work sheet and PowerPoint 

    Tuesday: Chapter 3 - Lesson 3.1 and 3.2

    Workbook pages 69-82

    Wednesday: Chapter 3 Lesson 3.3 and 3.5

    Workbook pages 83-87 and 101 and 102

    Thursday: Finish up Chapter 3 and Review for Light Waves unit Test

    Friday: Unit Test on Light Waves

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  • easter

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  • Robotics Classes         DATE:        March 11-15 2024

    Building and Designing a Maze

     

    8th Grade Science 

    DATE: March 11-15 2024

    monday-1.jpg March 11th  No School- In-service

     

    Tuesday-1.jpg March 12th Evolutionary History 2.1
    1: Warm-Up (10 min.)

    Students examine a diagram showing a front limb of a cat and a human (from Lesson 1.3). Students identify differences in these limbs in order to start thinking about structural differences, as they simultaneously gain more practice in making careful observations.

    2: Observing Organisms to Consider Differences (25 min.)

    Students analyze differences in the front limbs of three different organisms in order to begin thinking about how the environment could be related to differences in body structures.

    3: Discussing Differences (10 min.)

    Students make connections between the differences they found in the three species' body structures and what they know about natural selection and how organisms adapt to their environment.

    4: Homework

    Students practice making careful observations of two species in the Sim and relate the species' different environments to their different body structures.

     

    Wednesday-1.jpg March 13th Evolutionary History 2.2/Natural and Artificial Selection Gizmo
    1: Warm-Up (10 min.)

    Students practice thinking about the bone structures of a western gorilla and a European mole, as they consider what about the environments where these species live could help explain what their bone structures are like.

    2: Active Reading: Where Do Species Come From? (25 min.)

    Students practice the Active Reading approach while learning about speciation. The teacher uses this opportunity for an On-the-Fly Assessment of students' ability to summarize while reading.

    3: Discussing Annotations (10 min.)

    Students address potential confusions about speciation, evolution, and natural selection through a discussion of the reading. Students' annotations provide an opportunity for an On-the-Fly Assessment of annotation skills, reading comprehension, and content understanding.

    4. Complete Activity C on Natural Selection and Artificial Selection Gizmo

     

    thursday-1.jpg March 14th Evolutionary History 2.3
    1: Warm-Up (5 min.)

    Students think about a population of frogs and consider what would happen to two descendant species.

    2: Second Read: Where Do Species Come From? (20 min.)

    Students reread the article they chose in the last lesson from the Where Do Species Come From? article set, exploring how and why the separated population changed, to prepare for modeling that change in the Sim activity that follows. This activity provides an On-the-Fly Assessment of students' understanding of how body structures change, as well as an opportunity to assess their understanding of the crosscutting concept of Stability and Change.

    3: How One Population Becomes Two Species (20 min.)

    Students gain experience exploring how a common ancestor population will evolve differently depending on its environment.

    4: Homework

    Students use the Modeling Tool to apply their knowledge of how one species can give rise to two species when the common ancestor population is split into two different environments.

    friday-1.jpg March 15th Evolutionary History 2.4 

    1: Warm-Up (5 min.)

    Students' prior knowledge is activated as they place images on a timeline in order to grasp the magnitude of time that has passed during Earth's evolutionary history.

    2: Warm-Up Debrief (10 min.)

    The Warm-Up debrief prompts further thinking, using a calendar metaphor, about how much time it took for life-human life in particular-to evolve.

    3: Structure Change Card Sort (15 min.)

    A comparison of the time required for small and large structural changes to evolve helps students to understand how species that are descended from a common ancestor may evolve to have such significant differences.

    4: Evolutionary Time in the Sim (15 min.)

    The Evolutionary History Sim encourages students to examine how structural changes build up over time. They do this by following the evolutionary history of one living species backward in time to compare the species to fossil relatives.

    5: Homework

    Students reflect on what they learned about evolutionary time.

    6th Grade Science 

    DATE: March 11-15 2024        UNIT: Moons


    Monday 03/11-Teacher in Service

    Tuesday 03/12-   Review for the end
    of unit Test

     Wednesday 03/13- End of unit test in Edulastic

     Thursday 03/14-Finish End of Unit Test and Start Defining Vocabulary for new unit

    Friday 03/15-Start New Unit Light Waves                                                                                                                                                                                Lesson 1.2: Light and  Energy
    We will Watch a short video introducing how
    spectroscopists study light and its interactions with
    matter (energy and matter).

    1: Warm-Up: Pg # 5-6
    2: Skin Cancer in
    Australia: Pg # 7
    3: Evidence of Energy
    from Light: Pg # 8-9
    4: Homework: Pg # 10



     

     

     

     

    Week of February 26 - March 1st

    Robotics Class will be working on the Omnibots project Assignments

     

    6th Grade Science

    Monday: Covering Moon Phases-shading the phases work-sheet. Students will complete the moon phase model lab. 

    Tuesday: 

    Wednesday:

    Thursday:

    Friday:

    8th Grade Science

    monday-1.jpg February 26th Natural Selection Lesson 4.1
    1: Warm-Up (5 min.)

    Students annotate a passage from "The Stickleback Fish in Its Environment" article they read for homework. They begin thinking about factors in the stickleback environment that could determine whether its armor is an adaptive trait.

    2: Introducing Sticklebacks (10 min.)

    The teacher uses a slideshow to introduce students to the stickleback mystery and provides background information about how the stickleback population has changed over time.

    3: Examining Evidence About Sticklebacks (20 min.)

    Students carefully read and analyze the evidence they will use in the Science Seminar.

    4: Discussing Evidence and Claims (20 min.)

    In preparation for the Science Seminar, students sort, coordinate, and discuss pieces of evidence in order to determine how the evidence relates to the claims.

    Tuesday-1.jpg February 27th Natural Selection Lesson 4.2/4.3
    1: Warm-Up (10 min.)

    Students practice combining evidence to support a claim.

    2: Using the Reasoning Tool (10 min.)

    Students use the Reasoning Tool to make their reasoning about the Science Seminar evidence clear.

    3: Preparing to Write (10 min.)

    Students prepare to use their completed Reasoning Tools to write a scientific argument.

    4: Writing a Scientific Argument (15 min.)

    Students apply their knowledge of natural selection as they write a convincing scientific argument that explains why the stickleback population has less armor and has become faster compared to the sticklebacks 13 generations ago. Student writing represents an opportunity for students to demonstrate understanding through a three-dimensional performance. Student writing can be scored by referencing the provided rubric in the Natural Selection Rubrics for Final Written Argument (in Digital Resources).

    5: Homework

    Students engage in an important part of the writing process by reviewing and revising their written arguments.

    6: Self-Assessment (Optional)

    Students check their understanding of important content in the unit, and are given a chance to reflect on additional questions they have about natural selection in the newt population.

    Wednesday-1.jpg February 28th Louisiana Companion Lesson

     This lesson builds on and reinforces students’ understanding that an organism’s genes lead to their traits; students consider how environmental factors also contribute to an organism’s traits. In this lesson, students read the article “Growing Giant Pumpkins.” After the teacher models Active Reading, students read and annotate the article and then reflect on their annotations in partner and whole-class discussions. Students then revisit the article to learn more about factors that affect an organism’s growth. The purpose of this lesson is for students to learn that both genetics and environmental factors influence
    an organism’s growth.  Students will also complete a blooket to review for assessment. 

    thursday-1.jpg February 29th Natural Selection End of Unit Assessment  Students complete an End-of-Unit Assessment on Pear Assessment. The End-of-Unit Assessment indicates where students fall along the levels of the Progress Build after instruction by measuring their mastery of the specific ideas, both unit-specific science concepts and crosscutting concepts, that comprise each level of the Progress Build. The End-of-Unit Assessment also measures students’ understanding of important supporting content not explicitly included in the Progress Build. When analyzed with the Pre-Unit Assessment and Critical Juncture, the End-of-Unit Assessment results indicate students’ progress over the course of the unit.
    friday-1.jpg March 1st Pre-Unit Assessment Evolutionary History/Vocabulary Students complete a pre-unit assessment. The pre-unit assessment is diagnostic and designed to reveal students’ understanding of the unit’s core content—including unit-specific science concepts and crosscutting concepts—prior to instruction by indicating, for formative purposes, where students initially fall along the levels of the Progress Build (PB). The pre-unit assessment also measures students’ understanding of important supporting content not explicitly included in the PB. As such, the pre-unit assessment offers a baseline from which to measure growth of understanding over the course of the unit. Students will also complete vocabulary worksheets for evolutionary history to turn in for bonus points. 

     

     

     

    Week of February 19th-23rd 

    Robotics class: have assignments to complete in Roboblocky 

    6th Grade Science:

    Monday: test correction for End of Uit magnetic test in Edulastic, Define vocabulary for new Earth Moon and Sun Unit, Amplify Lesson 1.2

    Tuesday: Amplify Earth Moon and Sun: Lesson 1.3 workbook pg 9-12

    Wednesday: Amplify Earth Moon and Sun: Lesson 1.4 workbook pg. 13-18

    Thursday: Amplify Earth Moon and Sun: Chapter 2 Lesson 2.1 and 2.2 pg. 23-30

    Friday: Vocabulary Test and Lesson 2.3 pg 31-34

     

    8th Grade Science:

    Monday: Vocabulary Test on Natural Selection Unit, 32 words

    Tuesday: Natural Selection Lesson 3.1 pg. 95-99

    Wednesday: Natural Selection Lesson 3.2 pg.100-1-7

    Thursday:Natural Selection Lesson 3.3 pg.109-119

    Friday:Natural Selection Lesson 4.1 pg.122-126

     

     

     

     

    Short Week!!! No School for Monday February 12th -Wednesday February 14th Mardi Gras Mask (DTF Transfer) 

    Robotics class: using Roboblocky/assignments: create a story using scenes and backgrounds

    Thursday  2-15-24 

    6th Grade Science:  Magnet Fields end of Unit TEST! 

    8th Grade Science:  Natural Selection Gizmo worksheets- using Explored Learning app through launch-pad

    Friday  2-16-24

    6th Grade Science: Starting the New Unit on Earth, Moon, and Sun: Pre-assessment and Vocabulary words 

    8th Grade Science: Natural Selection Gizmo worksheets- using Explored Learning app through launch-pad

     

    Feb.2 - Feb. 9

    Robotics are working on 4 bots racing at one time. 

     

    6th Grade Science-Magnetic Fields Unit

    Monday- Ch. 3-Lesson 3.2 Pg 69

    Write and Share on attracting Magnets-Homework

    Tuesday- Ch. 3-Lesson 3.3 pg 82-91 Homework Drawing magnetic fore 

    Wednesday- Ch. 3 Lesson 3.5 pg. 94-110 

    Thursday- Ch 4 Lesson 4.1 pg 113-115

    Friday- Ch 4 Lesson 4.2 Pg 118-122 

     

    8th Grade Science - Natural Selection 

    monday-1.jpg February 5th Natural Selection Lesson 2.1
    1: Warm-Up (10 min.)

    Students read a new Sherman's Story that introduces them to the idea of how parents might influence whether adaptive traits are passed to their offspring.

    2: Reproduction in the Sim (15 min.)

    Students gather evidence in the Sim to refute the alternate conception that reproduction always produces offspring with adaptive traits.

    3: Traits Over Generations (20 min.)

    Students participate in an activity that demonstrates how offspring have traits that are like their parents' traits.

    4: Reading "Glowing Jellies" (20 min.)

    Students engage in a quick version of Active Reading, reading a short article about the protein molecule that causes crystal jellies to glow.

    5: Reflection (10 min.)

    Students answer the Investigation Question: How do individuals in a population get their traits?

    Tuesday-1.jpg February 6th Natural Selection Lesson 2.2

     

    1: Warm-Up (5 min.)

    Students examine spider parents and offspring and explain how the offspring got their traits.

    (Teacher Only) Observing Genes, Protein Molecules and Traits (15 min.)

    Students observe a model of reproduction in the Traits and Reproduction Sim in order to get a more in depth view of how genes are instructions for making protein molecules and how protein molecules lead to traits.

    2: Observing Reproduction in the Sim (20 min.)

    Students use the Sim to investigate how reproduction and adaptive traits are related.

    3: Responding to Sherman (20 min.)

    Students create a model and write a response to Sherman's alternate conceptions about reproduction.

    (Teacher Only) Introducing Homework (5 min.)

    The teacher introduces the homework.

    4: Homework

    Students make connections between natural selection and other topics they have studied in science.

    Wednesday-1.jpg February 7th Natural Selection Lesson 2.3

    Chapter 1 Quiz

    1: Warm-Up (10 min.)

    Students activate their prior knowledge about how natural selection changes populations over time, considering whether organisms with adaptive traits have longer lifespans.

    2: Active Reading: “The Deadly Dare” (25 min.)

    Students learn about the process of natural selection as they read about how poison works as an adaptive trait in rough-skinned newts and other organisms. This activity provides an opportunity for an On-the-Fly Assessment of students' ability to engage with scientific texts and to make deeper connections.

    3: Discussing Annotations (10 min.)

    Students discuss their thinking about the reading in order to share important insights and surface alternate conceptions. Students' annotations provide an opportunity for an On-the-Fly Assessment of students' annotation skills, reading comprehension, and content understanding.

    4: Homework

    Students have an opportunity to read about about the diverse history of science and how the theory of natural selection gained traction and prominence.

    thursday-1.jpg February 8th Natural Selection Lesson 2.4
    1: Warm-Up (5 min.)

    Students revisit a visual representation from "The Deadly Dare" to consider alternate ways of explaining natural selection.

    2: Rereading “The Deadly Dare” (20 min.)

    Students read with a new purpose: to look for information about how reproduction is a part of natural selection. The teacher uses this activity as an On-the-Fly assessment of students' understanding of the role of reproduction in changes to trait distributions.

    3: Reasoning About the Rough-Skinned Newts (18 min.)

    Students prepare to write a scientific argument by using the Reasoning Tool to make explicit connections between pieces of evidence and one of the claims.

    (Teacher Only) Introducing the Homework (2 min.)

    The teacher reminds students how to write a scientific argument, which they will be doing for homework.

    4: Homework

    Students use the work they have done in the Reasoning Tool to craft a scientific argument for Alex Young that explains the changes in the newt population.

    friday-1.jpg February 9th Natural Selection Critical Juncture

    Students complete a Critical Juncture Assessment. The CJ is designed to reveal students’ current levels of understanding of the unit’s core content, and the results are used to place each student at a particular level on the Progress Build (PB). These assessment results indicate students’ progress from the beginning of the unit and are used to group students for differentiated instruction in the next lesson. As with the Pre-Unit Assessment, the CJ includes content beyond what a student is expected to have mastered. Therefore, the CJ is not intended to be used for summative purposes.

     

     

     

     Jan. 29th-Feb. 2nd

    Robotic classes are working in the drawing tab to design animal faces. 

     

    6th Grade Science

    Magnetic Fields Unit

    Monday Jan 29th: amplify workbooks pg 54-60, chapter 2 lesson 2.4:Simulating Spacecraft Energy

    Tuesday Jan Tues 30th: amplify workbook 63-67, Chapter 3 lesson 3.1:Exploring Energy and Force Strength 

    Wednesday February 31st: edulastic mid-year assessment 

    Thursday February 1st: Magnetic Engineer worksheets for flocabulary 

    Friday February 2nd: Mostly Magnetic worksheets for flocabulary

     

     

    8th grade science class 

    January 29th

    Natural Selection Lesson 1.3

    1: Warm-Up (5 min.)

    Students reread an excerpt from the article "The Rough-Skinned Newt" in order to review the idea that individuals in a population can have different traits.

    2: Exploring Variation and Distribution in the Sim (20 min.)

    Students use the Simulation to reinforce their understanding of trait variation and distribution in populations.

    (Teacher Only) Video: Histograms (5 min.)

    An animated video helps students understand how histograms simply and accurately convey data about traits in populations.

    3: Defining Variation, Distribution, and Generation (5 min.)

    Students are introduced to text and visual definitions of the words variationdistribution, and generation.

    4: Building Histograms (10 min.)

    Students apply their understanding of variation and distribution to building histograms with manipulatives. The teacher uses this opportunity as an On-the-Fly Assessment of students' understanding of variation and distribution through the practice of representing data.

    5: Homework

    Students gain experience explaining how a histogram shows the traits in a population.

    January 30th

    Natural Selection Lesson 1.3 Flextention

     This hands-on activity builds on and reinforces students’ understanding of trait variation
    within a population. Students examine some sunflower seeds and observe their traits. They
    identify features of the sunflower seeds where there is variation in traits and group the
    seeds according to those traits. They then focus on differences in the number of stripes
    on the sunflower seed shells and construct histograms to represent the distribution of
    stripe numbers. The purpose of this lesson is for students to gain additional experience
    with trait variation and to practice constructing histograms.

    January 31st

    Natural Selection Lesson 1.4

    1: Warm-Up (7 min.)

    Students see that the variation and distribution of traits in a population can change over time.

    2: Observing Fur Traits and Temperature in the Sim (10 min.)

    By investigating an ostrilope population in a cold environment, students learn that adaptive traits help an individual survive in a particular environment, while non-adaptive traits make it harder to survive. The teacher uses this activity as an On-the-Fly Assessment of students' facility with the practice of analyzing and interpreting data.

    3: Modeling Changes to the Distribution of Traits (18 min.)

    Students create a model to show their ideas about why the distribution of a trait can change.

    4: Testing Predictions in the Sim (10 min.)

    Through investigating a population with low variation in a cold environment, students learn that changes in distribution of traits are determined by the traits present in the population.

    5: Homework

    Students read about a few organisms that live in the same environment as rough-skinned newts in order to apply their understanding of variation, traits, and changes in trait distribution.

    February 1st

    Natural Selection Lesson 1.5

     

    1: Warm-Up (5 min.)

    Students review how to describe the distribution of traits in a population by looking at new evidence about the poisonous newt population.

    2: Investigating Adaptive Traits in the Sim (25 min.)

    Students investigate if yellow is always an adaptive trait by observing yellow ostrilopes in yellow environments with and without carnithons.

    3: Modeling Trait Distribution in Thornpalms (15 min.)

    Students apply their understanding of why the distribution of traits in a population changes by making a prediction about the water-storage trait in thornpalms. The teacher uses this opportunity as an On-the-Fly Assessment of students' understanding of how the distribution of traits in a population changes when environmental factors make it more or less likely for organisms with certain traits to survive.

    4: Homework

    Students test their predictions from their Modeling Tools in the Simulation.

    February 2nd

    Natural Selection Lesson 1.6

     

    1: Warm-Up (10 min.)

    Students explore a common alternate conception and use their understanding of adaptive traits to explain why it is wrong.

    2: Write and Share: Changes in Populations (20 min.)

    Students participate in the Write and Share routine to practice using essential vocabulary and to apply their understanding about what makes the distribution of traits in a population change.

    3: Explaining Changes in the Newt Population (15 min.)

    Students examine histograms of the newt population and use what they have learned to explain why the newts in the population became more poisonous over time. The teacher uses this activity as an On-the-Fly Assessment of students' understanding of the crosscutting concept of Cause and Effect.

    4: Self-Assessment (Optional)

    Students check their understanding of key content in the unit, and are given a chance to reflect on additional questions they have about natural selection in the newt population.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    The Robotics class will be working on the drawing Tab lessons. Each day in class we will design different festive drawings, such as snowmen, Madri Gras Mask, and Hearts. 

    8th Grade Science: 

    January 8th

    Rock Transformation Lesson 3.1

    1: Warm-Up (10 min.)

    Students learn new information about the Rocky Mountains and consider what this means. This information provides motivation to learn how rock formations can move from underground to the surface.

    2: “The Oldest Rock Formations on Earth” (25 min.)

    Students read to learn about how uplift affects rock formations using the example of one of the oldest rock formations on Earth. The teacher uses this opportunity as an On-the-Fly Assessment of students’ progress in engaging with scientific texts and asking deeper questions.

    3: Discussing Annotations (10 min.)

    Students discuss their thinking about the reading in order to share important insights and surface alternate conceptions. Students’ annotations provide an opportunity for an On-the-Fly Assessment of annotation skills, reading comprehension, and content understanding.

    4: Homework

    Students use the Plate Motion Simulation to explore plate motion and generate ideas about how plate motion can cause rock formations to move.

    January 9th

    Rock Transformation Lesson 3.2

    1: Warm-Up (10 min.)

    Students observe how plate motion can move rock formations.

    2: Second Read of Rock Formations Article (20 min.)

    Students revisit the “The Oldest Rock Formations on Earth” article to gather evidence about how rock formations can move between Earth’s surface and Earth’s interior.

    3: Moving Rock Formations (15 min.)

    Students complete Sim missions in order to understand the role of plate motion in rock transformation processes.

    4: Homework

    Students complete additional Sim missions in order to apply their knowledge.

    January 10th

    Rock Transformation Lesson 3.3

    1: Warm-Up (5 min.)

    Students prepare to participate in the classroom model.

    2: Moving Through Rock Transformations (20 min.)

    Students engage in a classroom model of how rock material is transported and transformed on Earth.

    3: Mapping Rock Transformation Paths (15 min.)

    Students sketch out and share the path their rock material took in the model in order to make sense of how uplift and subduction relate to rock transformations.

    4: Reflecting on Rock Transformations (5 min.)

    Students reflect on what they learned by explaining how uplift and subduction can affect rock transformation processes.

    January 11th

    Rock Transformation Lesson 3.4

    1: Warm-Up (5 min.)

    Students use the Sorting Tool to review rock movement and exposure to energy during plate motion.

    2: Write and Share: Moving Rock Formations (15 min.)

    Students use the Write and Share Routine to apply their understanding of how uplift and subduction move rock formations. The teacher uses this opportunity as an On-the-Fly Assessment of students’ understanding of the crosscutting concept of Matter and Energy.

    3: Modeling Rock Transformations (25 min.)

    Students demonstrate their understanding of how rocks transform by creating a model that communicates the process by which they think rock from one region transformed into rock in another. The teacher uses this opportunity as an On-the-Fly Assessment of students’ understanding of how plate motion can lead to rock transformations.

    4: Homework

    Students write their final report explaining how the Rocky Mountains and Great Plains formed.

    5: Self-Assessment (Optional)

    Students check their understanding of important content in the unit and are given a chance to reflect on additional questions they have about rock transformations.

    January 12th

    Rock Transformation Lesson 4.1

    1: Warm-Up (5 min.)

    In preparation for their investigation of rocks on Venus, students consider whether or not rock transformations occur on other planets.

    2: Rock Transformations on Venus (5 min.)

    Students are introduced to a new problem regarding rock transformations on Venus.

    3: Evaluating Rock Observations (20 min.)

    Students evaluate Venus Evidence Cards in order to determine which are most useful.

    4: Comparing Rock on Earth and Venus (15 min.)

    Students are introduced to two claims, which they will discuss in the Science Seminar. They are given images of rocks on Earth to compare to those found on Venus.

    6th Grade Science 

    lesson

  • Robotics Class For 12-12-23

    Students will be working in the Roboblocky program designing bots to match code blocks. 

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  • 6th Grade Science week of 12-11-23

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  • Week of December 12, 2023

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  • 6th Grade Science 

    Amplify Unit: Force and Motion

    Monday: Gizmo handout to be completed in class using the online simulation app through Lunch pad

    Tuesday: Chapter 1 Lesson 1.3 and 1.4                workbook pages 11-17

    Wednesday: Chapter 1 Lesson 1.4                 workbook pages 18-19

    Thursday: Chapter 1 Lesson 1.5                workbook pages 21-24

    Friday: Chapter 1 Lesson 1.6                  workbook pages 26-39      

     

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  • 8th Grade

    6th and 8th Hour

     

    December 4th

    Rock Transformation Lesson 1.5

    1: Warm-Up (5 min.)

    Students review the “Rocks on the Beach” article, which they read for homework. They review descriptions of how different rock types form, solidifying their understanding of the two processes covered so far.

    2: Modeling How Rocks Form (15 min.)

    Students show their current understanding of how sedimentary and igneous rocks form. They use the Modeling Tool to communicate their ideas with other students. The teacher uses this opportunity as an On-the-Fly Assessment of students’ ideas about how sedimentary and igneous rocks form.

    3: Evaluating Rock Observations (17 min.)

    Students consider evidence about the rock of the two study regions. They apply an understanding of detailed observations to evaluate the given evidence.

    4: Discussing How the Rocks Formed (8 min.)

    Students use the evidence about the rock of the Great Plains and Rocky Mountains. They determine which rock type is found in each region and how those rocks formed.

    5: Homework

    Students practice supporting a scientific argument with evidence in order to explain their current thinking about the claims.

    6: Self-Assessment (Optional)

    Students check their understanding of important content in the unit and are given a chance to reflect on additional questions they have about rock transformations.

    December 5th

    Rock Transformation Louisiana Companion Document

    This lesson builds on and reinforces students’ understanding of how sedimentary rock
    forms by applying this idea to the formation of crude oil—the material used to make
    plastic. In this lesson, students read the article “From Living Things to Plastic: A Journey
    Through Rock.” After the teacher models Active Reading, students read and annotate
    the article and then reflect on their annotations in partner and whole-class discussions. 

    December 6th

    Rock Transformation Lesson 2.1

    1: Warm-Up (5 min.)

    Students begin to think about where magma and sediment come from in order to activate their prior knowledge and surface their initial thinking.

    2: Exploring How Magma and Sediment Form (20 min.)

    Students use the Sim to understand how different energy sources drive processes that form rocks.

    (Teacher Only) Playing Understanding Weathering (10 min.)

    Students watch a video to help them gain a deeper understanding of how weathering affects rock formations.

    3: Sorting Rock Processes (10 min.)

    Students identify the energy sources that drive rock transformation and indicate where these processes occur.

    4: Homework

    Students watch the Understanding Weathering video again in order to better understand weathering and erosion.

    December 7th

    Rock Transformation Flextention Activity

    This hands-on activity builds on and reinforces students’ understanding of rock
    characteristics, how rocks form, and the work of geologists who study rocks. Students
    are introduced to minerals and the idea that rocks are composed of one or more minerals.
    To identify a mystery mineral, students gather evidence through observations (color and
    luster) and the results of diagnostic tests (hardness, streak, magnetic attraction, and
    density). The purpose of this lesson is to extend students’ understanding of rock formations
    and rock transformations and to expose them to common investigation practices in
    geology.

    December 8th

    Rock Transformation Lesson 2.2

    1: Warm-Up (5 min.)

    Students observe an image and apply their understanding of erosion.

    2: Active Reading: “Devils Tower” (25 min.)

    Students read to learn about how sediment and magma are formed using the example of a famous rock formation in Wyoming. The teacher uses this opportunity as an On-the-Fly Assessment of students’ ability to engage with scientific texts and ask deeper questions.

    3: Discussing Annotations (10 min.)

    Students discuss their thinking about the reading in order to share important insights and surface alternate conceptions. Students’ annotations provide an opportunity for an On-the-Fly Assessment of annotation skills, reading comprehension, and content understanding.

    4: Reflecting on Magma and Sediment (5 min.)

    Students reflect on what they have learned so far about what causes magma and sediment to form.

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  • We are starting a new unit this week on Force and Motion in Amplify.

    Monday: Introduction to Newtons 3 Laws of Motion-Notes with a short Video Clip

    Tuesday: New workbooks given out and vocabulary word review 

    Wednesday: Amplify Pre-Assessment in Edulastic and Chapter 1 Lesson 1.2

    Thursday: Amplify Force and Motion 

    Chapter 1 Lesson 1.2

    Friday: Vocabulary test on force and Motion words. 

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  • November 27th

    Rock Transformation Lesson 1.1

    Students will complete a pre-unit assessment on Rock Transformation. The Pre-Unit Assessment is diagnostic and designed to reveal students’ understanding of the unit’s core content—including unit-specific science concepts and crosscutting concepts—prior to instruction by indicating, for formative purposes, where students initially fall along the levels of the Progress Build. The Pre-Unit Assessment also measures students’ understanding of important supporting content not explicitly included in the Progress Build. As such, it offers a baseline from which to measure growth of understanding over the course of the unit.

    November 28th

    Rock Transformation Lesson 1.2

    1: Warm-Up (10 min.)

    Students use prior knowledge to answer a question about how rocks form.

    Video: Geology 101 (5 min.)

    A short video introduces students to their roles as geologists. They also learn about the mystery they will be investigating throughout this unit.

    2: Thinking Like a Geologist (10 min.)

    Students share initial ideas about the investigation and become familiar with the Great Plains and Rocky Mountains.

    3: Observing Hand Samples of Rock (20 min.)

    Students inspect hand samples of different types of rock and consider what it means to make detailed observations.

    November 29th

    Rock Transformation Lesson 1.3

    1: Warm-Up (10 min.)

    Students practice decoding a cross-section diagram of rock formations to prepare them for the cross-section representation in the Simulation.

    2: Forming Rocks in the Simulation (25 min.)

    Students explore the Simulation and discover different processes that can form different types of rock.

    3: Considering How Rocks Form (10 min.)

    Students reflect on processes that form different rocks in the Sim. The teacher uses this opportunity as an On-the-Fly Assessment of students’ ideas about how rocks form.

    4: Family Homework Experience (Optional)

    Exploring rocks at home supports student learning through shared experiences with family.

    November 30th

    Rock Transformation Lesson 1.4

    1: Warm-Up (5 min.)

    In preparation for gathering evidence, students consider why the process of forming rocks is difficult to observe.

    2: Modeling How Sediment Forms Rock (15 min.)

    Students use hard candy to model how sedimentary rock forms.

     Playing Cooling Magma (2 min.)

    The teacher projects video footage of magma flowing and then cooling on an island in Hawaii.

    3: Discussing How Magma Forms Rock (8 min.)

    Students engage in a discussion about how magma forms igneous rock.

    4: Rock Types and How They Form (15 min.)

    Students use a set of characteristics to help identify the rock samples they initially studied in Lesson 1.2.

    5: Homework

    Students read an article about different rocks on the beach and how they formed.

    December 1st

    Rock Transformation Lesson 1.5

    1: Warm-Up (5 min.)

    Students review the “Rocks on the Beach” article, which they read for homework. They review descriptions of how different rock types form, solidifying their understanding of the two processes covered so far.

    2: Modeling How Rocks Form (15 min.)

    Students show their current understanding of how sedimentary and igneous rocks form. They use the Modeling Tool to communicate their ideas with other students. The teacher uses this opportunity as an On-the-Fly Assessment of students’ ideas about how sedimentary and igneous rocks form.

    3: Evaluating Rock Observations (17 min.)

    Students consider evidence about the rock of the two study regions. They apply an understanding of detailed observations to evaluate the given evidence.

    4: Discussing How the Rocks Formed (8 min.)

    Students use the evidence about the rock of the Great Plains and Rocky Mountains. They determine which rock type is found in each region and how those rocks formed.

    5: Homework

    Students practice supporting a scientific argument with evidence in order to explain their current thinking about the claims.

    6: Self-Assessment (Optional)

    Students check their understanding of important content in the unit and are given a chance to reflect on additional questions they have about rock transformations.

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  • No School November 20-24, 2023 

    Turkey Day

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  • Robotics class 7th and 8th Graders

    Students are Finishing our Road Trip and Zoo Projects this week. 

    Please check your grades in the Student Progress center for any missed assignments! 

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  • 6th Grade Science 

    Matter and Energy in Ecosystems

    Monday:  Lesson 3.1 Workbook pg. 69-72

    Tuesday: Lesson 3.2 Workbook pg. 73-78

    Wednesday: Lesson 3.3 Workbook pg. 79-84

    Thursday: Lesson 3.4 Workbook pg. 85-90

    Friday: Finish Lesson 3.4 Final Writing  

     

     

     

     

    8th Grade Science 

    workwkwork

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  • Week of October 30th -November 3rd

     

    Robotics classes will be working on Roboblocky assignments and chapter projects.

     

    6th Grade Science class- Matter and Energy Unit

    Monday: Chapter 1 Lesson 1.2 and 1.3 Workbook pg. 6-12

    Tuesday: Chapter 1 Lesson 1.4 and 1.5 Workbook pg. 14-26

    Wednesday: Chapter 1 Lesson 1.6 Chapter 2 lesson 2.1 lesson 2.1 workbook pg. 29-40

    Thursday: Chapter 2 Lesson 2.2 workbook pg. 42-46

    Friday: Vocabulary Test

     

    8th Grade Science: Plate Motion Louisiana Companion Lessons

    Monday: Companion Lessons workbook pg1-4

    Tuesday: return Amplify workbook on Plate Motion Chapter 3 Lesson 3.4 pgs. 91-98

    Wednesday: Amplify workbook on Plate Motion Chapter 4 Lesson 4.1 pgs.99-106

    Thursday: Amplify workbook on Plate Motion Chapter 4 Lesson 4.3 pgs.112-120

    Friday- Building Pangaea Gizmo in Explored leaning app/launch pad -packet completed for a grade

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  • .

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  • Week of October 16th-20th

     

    Robotics classes will be working on Roboblocky assignments and chapter projects.

     

    6th Grade Science class- Populations and Resources Unit

    Monday: Chapter 2 Lesson 2.4 and 2.6 Workbook pg. 46-60

    Tuesday: Chapter 2 Lesson 2.7 Workbook pg. 61-73

    Wednesday: Chapter 3 Lesson 3.1 and 3.2 workbook pg. 74-84

    Thursday: Chapter 3 Lesson 3.3 workbook pg. 85-90

    Friday: Checking understanding Quiz of chapters 1 and 2

     

    8th Grade Science: Plate Motion Unit

    Monday: Chapter 2 Lesson 2.3 and 2.4 workbook pg. 36-48

    Tuesday: Chapter 2 finish up Lesson 2.4 workbook pg. 46-48

    Wednesday: Chapter 2 Lesson 2.5 workbook pg. 49-53

    Thursday: Chapter 2 Lesson 2.7 workbook pg-54-73

    Friday- Checking Understanding Quiz of chapters 1 and 2 and fishing lesson 2.7

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  • ok

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