W E L C O M E

  • Week of 5/9/22

    Monday: Begin writing adventure stories inspired by the novel

    Tuesday: Continue reading chapter 5 of The Call of the Wild & write adventure stories

    Wednesday: Read chapter 6 & revise and edit adventure stories

    Thursday: Read chapter 7 & Digital Citizenship presentation

    Friday: Begin reading adventure stories out loud & identify literary devices in the novel

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  • Week of 5/2/22

     

    Monday: Begin reading chapter 5 of Call of the Wild

    Tuesday-Thursday: LEAP TESTING

    Friday: Finish reading chapter 5 of Call of the Wild

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  • Week of 4/25/22

    LEAP Testing

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  • Week of 4/11/22

    Monday: Section 1 CHOICES PROJECT

    Tuesday: Lesson 9- Students will begin reading Chapter 2 of The Call of the Wild, define words in context, and continue adding text evidence for incidents that reveal deeper insight into the characters of Buck and his owners, Francois and Perrault.

    Wednesday: Lesson 10- Students will finish reading Chapter 2 of The Call of the Wild . They will also continue adding text evidence for incidents that reveal deeper insight into Buck’s character as he continues to embrace the wild and his primitive nature.

    Thursday: LEAP REVIEW

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  • Week of 4/4/22:

     

    Monday: Anticipatory Set/Intro to Unit 4

    Tuesday: Lesson 1 (Links to an external site.) Students discuss ideas related to the Unit Essential Questions. They read, discuss, and paraphrase the epigraph of The Call of the Wild and make predictions about the text based on all activities from the lesson.

     Wednesday:

    Lesson 2 (Links to an external site.)

    Students will read part of Chapter One of The Call of the Wild and begin to characterize Buck by considering how his experiences and interactions with humans impact him. Students will also define words in context.
    Thursday: Lesson 3 (Links to an external site.) Students continue reading Chapter 1 of The Call of the Wild, build vocabulary through context, and discuss how the author’s word choice and description set a tone/mood that emphasizes Buck’s return to a primitive state. 

     Friday:

    Lesson 4 (Links to an external site.)

    Students finish reading Chapter 1 of The Call of the Wild, define words in context, and begin to gather text evidence to identify incidents from Chapter 1 that reveal insight into the themes and characters of Buck, Spitz, and Francois.
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  • Week of 3/28/22

    Monday: Lesson 34Links to an external site.:  Students are introduced to the Extension Task, brainstorm issues, and select an issue and texts for research.

    Tuesday: Lesson 35Links to an external site.:  Students examine two sources with different perspectives about the same issue as practice for their own research task.

    Wednesday: Lesson 36Links to an external site.:  Students conduct research about their selected issue for the extension task and begin to evaluate the credibility of their research sources.

    Thursday:Lesson 37Links to an external site.:  Students practice evaluating the advantages and disadvantages of different mediums presenting the same perspective of an issue. They then do the same for their research issue and begin planning their Extension Task presentation.

    Friday: Lesson 38Links to an external site.:  Students create a multimedia presentation on an issue, evaluating the credibility of sources about the issue.

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  • Week of 3/21/22

     

    Monday: Lesson 30 (Links to an external site.):  Students begin the writing process to discuss in writing what their independent reading novel reveals about truth, perception, and/or reality and compares how the development of the concept is different from another unit text.

    Tuesday: Lesson 31 (Links to an external site.):  Students continue the writing process to discuss in writing what their independent reading novel reveals about truth, perception, and/or reality and compare how the development of the concept is different from another unit text.

    Wednesday:Lesson 32 (Links to an external site.):  Students continue the writing process to discuss in writing what their independent reading novel reveals about truth, perception, and/or reality and compare how the development of the concept is different from another unit text.

    Thursday: Lesson 33 (Links to an external site.):  Students complete their final drafts of their essays that discuss in writing what their independent reading novel reveals about truth, perception, and/or reality and compare how the development of the concept is different from another unit text.

    Friday: Flex day & LEAP prep

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  • Week of 3/15/22

    Monday: Lesson 27 (Links to an external site.):  Students analyze different aspects of their independent reading novel in preparation for a literature circles discussion.

    Tuesday: Lesson 28 (Links to an external site.):  Students participate in a collaborative discussion of their independent reading novel. They also gather evidence from their independent reading novels for a Socratic seminar about how the unit texts comment on the unit focus questions.

    Wednesday: Lesson 29 (Links to an external site.):  Students engage in a Socratic seminar to discuss the unit focus questions.

    Thursday: Lesson 30 (Links to an external site.):  Students begin the writing process to discuss in writing what their independent reading novel reveals about truth, perception, and/or reality and compares how the development of the concept is different from another unit text.

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  • Week of 2/21/22

    Monday: Lesson 19 (Links to an external site.):   Students rewrite a scene from “The Ransom of Red Chief” from a different point of view and then examine how changing the narrative point of view impacts the meaning of the text.

    Lesson 20 (Links to an external site.):  Students read and summarize “The Tell-Tale Heart” by Edgar Allan Poe.

     Tuesday: Lesson 21 (Links to an external site.):   Students read and discuss the details of “The Tell-Tale Heart” by Edgar Allan Poe. They also examine the narrative point of view in “The Tell-Tale Heart.”  

    Wednesday: Lesson 22 (Links to an external site.):  Students analyze the effect of repetition, sentence structure, and pacing in “The Tell-Tale Heart” and identify and discuss the effect of differences of point of view.

     Thursday: Lesson 23 (Links to an external site.):   Students discuss the reliability of the narrator in "The Tell-Tale Heart" and write a response about the effect of narrative point of view on the text’s meaning.

     Friday: Lesson 24 (Links to an external site.):   Students prepare to write a version of “The Tell-Tale Heart” from a different point of view by choosing another narrator and brainstorming what that point of view of the new narrator might convey.  

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  • Week of 2/14/22

     

    Monday: Lesson 14 (Links to an external site.):  Students begin reading “The Ransom of Red Chief” by O. Henry. Students analyze how words, phrases, and details reveal aspects of the characters.

    Tuesday: Lesson 15 (Links to an external site.):   Students will read the rest of “The Ransom of Red Chief” by O. Henry, define words in context, and summarize the plot of the story.

     Wednesday: Lesson 16 (Links to an external site.):  Students read “The Ransom of Red Chief” and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of the text.

    Thursday: Lesson 17 (Links to an external site.):   Students read “The Ransom of Red Chief” and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of the text.

    Friday: Lesson 18 (Links to an external site.):   Students will review how narrative point of view impacts the reader’s understanding of a text and discuss how “The Ransom of Red Chief” would change with a different narrative point of view. 

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  • Week of 2/7/22

    Monday: Lesson 9Links to an external site.:  Students read “Good Form” and discuss the controversy surrounding James Frey’s memoir to further explore the concepts of “truth,” “perception,” and “reality.” Note: A Million Little Pieces is not appropriate for students to read in grade 8. The purpose of this lesson is discuss the controversy surrounding the memoir genre. It is not meant to encourage or suggest students read A Million Little Pieces.

    Tuesday: Lesson 10Links to an external site.:  Students discuss the unit focus questions, begin reading “Narrative Point of View: Some Considerations” by John Lye, and continue reading their independent reading novel.

    Wednesday: Lesson 11Links to an external site.:  Students read “Narrative Point of View: Some Considerations” by John Lye and read their independent reading books.

    Thursday: Lesson 12Links to an external site.:  Students analyze different aspects of their independent reading novel in preparation for a literature circles discussion.

    Friday: Lesson 13Links to an external site.:  Students participate in a collaborative discussion of their independent reading novel.

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  • Week of 1/31/22

    Monday: Lesson 4 (Links to an external site.):  Students will read and discuss an excerpt from Plato’s “The Allegory of the Cave” to determine Plato’s message and supporting evidence.

    Tuesday: Lesson 5 (Links to an external site.):  Students will read and discuss an excerpt from Plato’s “The Allegory of the Cave” to determine Plato’s message and supporting evidence.

    Wednesday: Lesson 6 (Links to an external site.):  Students will continue reading Plato’s “Allegory of the Cave,” defining vocabulary words in context, and summarizing the ideas that Plato conveys in the allegory.

    Thursday: Lesson 7 (Links to an external site.):  Students will discuss the meaning and purpose of Plato’s “The Allegory of the Cave.”

    Friday: Lesson 8 (Links to an external site.):  Students evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of different mediums and then compare and contrast the structure of the texts they have viewed/read to consider how the texts use different structures to convey similar ideas.

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  • Week of 1/24/22

    Monday: Lesson 29 (Links to an external site.): Students revise their writing using a checklist then engage in a peer editing conference.

    Tuesday: Lesson 30 (Links to an external site.): Students engage in multiple readings of a poem to determine how repetition and allusion contribute to the theme.

    Wednesday: Lesson 1 (Links to an external site.):  Students begin to consider the unit questions and discuss the painting The Treachery of Images by René Magritte.

    Thursday: Lesson 2 (Links to an external site.):  Students select and begin reading an independent reading novel related to the unit focus.

    Friday:Lesson 3 (Links to an external site.):  Students select and begin reading an independent reading novel related to the unit focus.

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  • Week of 1/17/22

     

    Monday: NO SCHOOL

    Tuesday: Lesson 27 (Links to an external site.): Students begin drafting the argumentative essay. Students engage in a grammar mini-lesson to practice using verbs in the active and passive voice.

    Wednesday: Lesson 28 (Links to an external site.): Students continue drafting the argumentative essay. Students engage in a grammar mini-lesson to practice using varied transitions.

    Thursday & Friday: Interim Testing

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  • Week of 1/10/22

    Monday: Lesson 19/20 (Links to an external site.): Students use the sentence composing strategy to revise sentences in an example draft of an explanatory essay.

    Tuesday: Review Day

    Wednesday: Cold Read Task & Section 5 Quiz

    Thursday: Lesson 23 (Links to an external site.): Students read and discuss Part Four of Sugar Changed the World in small groups.

    Friday: Lesson 26 (Links to an external site.): Students analyze an argumentative prompt and develop an outline for the essay. Students engage in a peer conference to get feedback on their outline.

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  • Week of 12/13/21 

     

    Monday: Research Project Presentations

    Tuesday: Research Project Presentations

    Wednesday: Research Project Presentations

    Thursday: Christmas Activity

    Friday: Christmas Activity

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  • Week of 12/6/21

     

    Monday: Lesson 12:  Students begin reading Part Three of Sugar Changed the World and summarize the text using a timeline. Students do a close reading to analyze the development of the central idea over the course of the text. (Links to an external site.)

    Tuesday: Lesson 13 (Links to an external site.):  Students continue reading Part Three of Sugar Changed the World and use the timeline to summarize the text. Students do a close reading to analyze the development of the central idea over the course of the text.

    Wednesday: Lesson 14 (Links to an external site.):  Students do a close reading of the text to analyze specific paragraphs. Students evaluate the authors’ claims in Sugar Changed the World.

    Thursday: Review day

    Friday: Unit 2 Section 4 Quiz

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  • Week of 11/29/21

     

    Monday: Lesson 9:  Students begin reading Part Two of Sugar Changed the World and continue using the timeline to summarize the text. Students do a close reading of several passages to analyze the authors’ word choice and how it contributes to conveying the purpose of the text. (Links to an external site.)

    Tuesday: Lesson 10: (Links to an external site.)  Students continue reading Part Two of Sugar Changed the World and annotate to identify the main ideas in the text. Students do a close reading and use a graphic organizer to record the central idea and analyze the relationship between the central idea and supporting ideas in the text.  

    Wednesday: Lesson 11: (Links to an external site.)  Students continue reading Part Two of Sugar Changed the World. Students analyze the authors’ response to conflicting evidence and viewpoints in the text.

    Thursday: Review day

    Friday: Section 2-3 quiz

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  • Week of 11/15/21

    Monday: Sugar Research Project

    Tuesday: Sugar Research Project

    Wednesday: Lesson 5:   (Links to an external site.)Students read the prologue of Sugar Changed the World and annotate using sticky notes. Students analyze how the authors make connections among individuals, ideas, and events in history and determine the author’s purpose for writing the text.

    Thursday: Lesson 6: (Links to an external site.)  Students begin to read Part One of Sugar Changed the World and use a timeline to summarize the history of sugar. Students add to their vocabulary log and engage in a close reading and discussion of the authors’ word choice and its impact on meaning and tone in the text.

    Friday: Lesson 7: (Links to an external site.)  Students finish reading Part One of Sugar Changed the World and continue using a timeline to summarize the history of sugar. Students do a close reading to analyze the structure of a paragraph and its role in developing a key concept.

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  • Week of 11/8/21

    Monday: Lesson 3 (Links to an external site.) Students analyze the poet’s tone in “Sugar Cane” by Grace Nichols. Students use the OPTIC strategy to analyze elements of the painting Cane Cutting Scene and determine the artist’s tone in the painting.

    Tuesday: Lesson 4: (Links to an external site.)  Students discuss how personification, symbolism, and tone contribute to the theme in “Sugar Cane.” Students practice determining the best evidence to support a claim and write the reasoning component of an argumentative paragraph to explain how the evidence supports the claim.

    Wednesday: Review Day!

    Thursday: NO SCHOOL

    Friday: Section 1 Quiz

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  • Week of 11/1/21

    Monday: Flowers Cold Read Task

    Tuesday: Set the Context videos 

    Wednesday: Lesson 1 (Links to an external site.):  Students read the poem “Sugar Cane” by Grace Nichols and determine the meaning of unknown words using context and the dictionary. Students also paraphrase and summarize the poem.

    Thursday: Lesson 2:  Students do a close reading of the poem “Sugar Cane” by Grace Nichols and analyze the poet’s use of personification and symbolism. (Links to an external site.)

    Friday: Lesson 3 (Links to an external site.) Students analyze the poet’s tone in “Sugar Cane” by Grace Nichols. Students use the OPTIC strategy to analyze elements of the painting Cane Cutting Scene and determine the artist’s tone in the painting.

     

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  • Week of 10/25/21

    Monday: L22-Students will evaluate a written response rubric and annotate exemplar responses.

    Tuesday: L23-Students will evaluate a written response rubric and annotate exemplar responses then evaluate their own response according to the rubric.

    Wednesday: L24-Students will revise their essays and prepare for the final submission.

    Thursday: L25-Watch Flowers for Algernon movie

    Friday: L25-Watch Flowers for Algernon movie & complete a compare and contrast activity

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  • Week of 10/18/21Monday--NO SCHOOL

    Tuesday: Lesson 30- (Links to an external site.) Students begin the writing process to answer the prompt: Has Charlie fundamentally changed from the beginning of “Flowers for Algernon”? Is his life improved as a result of the surgery?

    Wednesday: Lesson 31- (Links to an external site.)Students continue the writing process by creating a first draft to answer the prompt: Has Charlie fundamentally changed from the beginning of “Flowers for Algernon”? Is his life improved as a result of the surgery?

    Thursday: Lesson 32- (Links to an external site.) Students annotate and score an example response to establish expectations for their own writing in response to the prompt: Has Charlie fundamentally changed from the beginning of “Flowers for Algernon”? Is his life improved as a result of the surgery?

    Friday: Lesson 33- (Links to an external site.) Students continue annotating and scoring example responses and then revise their own writing in response to the prompt: Has Charlie fundamentally changed from the beginning of “Flowers for Algernon”? Is his life improved as a result of the surgery?

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  • Week of 10/13

    Wednesday: Review lessons 24-27

    Thursday: Finish lesson 28

    Friday: Socratic Seminar & Unit 2 Cold Read

    **QUILL bell ringer grade DUE FRIDAY**

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  • Week of 9/27/21

    Monday: Review day in preparation for Section 5 Quiz

    Tuesday: Section 5 Quiz & Lesson 21- Students work collaboratively to write a new progress report which reveals additional aspects of a character and/or propels the action of the story.

    Wednesday: Lesson 21- Students work collaboratively to write a new progress report which reveals additional aspects of a character and/or propels the action of the story.

    Thursday: Lesson 22- Students read a progress report from “Flowers for Algernon” independently and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of the text. (Multiple Choice Questions)--GRADED

    Friday: Lesson 23- Students continue to read a progress report from “Flowers for Algernon” independently and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of the text. (Essay Questions)--GRADED

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  • Week of 9/20/21

    MondayLesson 15- (Links to an external site.)Students engage in a Socratic seminar to discuss how the surgery changes Charlie.

           Homework: Read chapter 4 of Frankenstein in your Unit Reader. Circle unfamililar words and replace them with a synonym. Write a one word summary in the margins for each paragraph.

    Tuesday: Section 4 Quiz & Lesson 16- (Links to an external site.)Students continue reading “Flowers for Algernon” and continue filling out the Before and After Surgery chart and the Irony Tracker.

    Wednesday: Lesson 17- (Links to an external site.)Students read an excerpt from Chapter 4 of Frankenstein. They ask questions about excerpt and write a brief summary. Lesson 18- (Links to an external site.)Students reread the excerpt from Chapter 4 of Frankenstein and analyze its language by categorizing words and phrases into knowledge/learning, time/movement, or emotions/motivations.

    Thursday: Lesson 19- (Links to an external site.) Students analyze the language of the excerpt from Frankenstein to determine how it contributes to the meaning and tone of the passage. They also use the language as models for their own writing.

    Friday: Lesson 20- (Links to an external site.) Students compare and contrast the structure of “Flowers for Algernon” and the excerpt from Frankenstein to determine how each contributes to similar meanings.

    **Literary Terms Quiz on Friday**

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  • Week of 9/7/21

    Tuesday: Lesson 9- (Links to an external site.)Students locate evidence to support a claim they’re making about the usefulness of the projective tests used on Charlie. They engage in a discussion and then write the first draft of a response.

    Wednesday: Lesson 10- (Links to an external site.) Students use information gained from “What's in an Inkblot? Some Say, Not Much” to develop and defend a claim about “Flowers for Algernon.” They work with peers to revise their written responses.

    Thursday: Review Day!!

    Friday: Section 2-3 Quiz

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  • Monday: Section 1 Quiz (lessons 1-4)

     

    Weekly Lessons (8/30)

    Monday: Lesson 5-  (Links to an external site.)Students read the first three progress reports of “Flowers for Algernon” by Daniel Keyes. Students will analyze Charlie’s character based on the content and structure of the text.

    Tuesday: Lesson 6- (Links to an external site.) Students read “What's in an Inkblot? Some Say, Not Much” and analyze the academic vocabulary.

    Wednesday: Lesson 7- (Links to an external site.)Students reread “What's in an Inkblot? Some Say, Not Much” to understand the controversy surrounding the use of projective tests.

    Thursday: Lesson 8- (Links to an external site.) Students reread “What's in an Inkblot? Some Say, Not Much” and analyze the argument to determine a central idea and then develop written claims.

    Friday: Lesson 9- (Links to an external site.)Students locate evidence to support a claim they’re making about the usefulness of the projective tests used on Charlie. They engage in a discussion and then write the first draft of a response.

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  • Weekly Plan (8/23):

    Lesson 1 (Links to an external site.)Students summarize "The Story of Prometheus." 

    Lesson 2 (Links to an external site.)Students revise their summaries of "The Story of Prometheus" to incorporate grade level sentence constructions. 

    Lesson 3 (Links to an external site.)Students reread "The Story of Prometheus" and work with the language to analyze how the author’s word choice impacts tone and meaning. 

    Lesson 4 (Links to an external site.)Students engage in a discussion about “The Story of Prometheus” to demonstrate understanding of the text and write a thematic analysis paragraph. 

    Group Presentation- Students will create a power point slide show and present it to the class to demonstrate their understanding of the section. 

    Section Quiz- Students will complete the Learnzillion Section Quiz as a class seminar.

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  • Parents!

    I can't wait to get to know each of your impressive kiddos this school year! Even though we face uncertain challenges, I am confident that students will continue to surprise us and thrive in the classroom.

     

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