October 16th-20th

 
 
 
 
 
 

Monday 

 
 
 
 
 

October 16th 

 
 
 
 
 

Plate Motion Lesson 2.3 

 
 
 
 
 

1: Warm-Up (5 min.) 

Students connect their investigation of convergent and divergent plate boundaries to the mystery of how the Mesosaurus fossils got so far apart. 

 

2: Second Read of “Listening to Earth” (20 min.) 

Students reread part of the article to describe movement at convergent and divergent plate boundaries, and to identify similarities and differences between what happens at each type of plate boundary. 

 

3: Creating Physical Models of Plate Motion (20 min.) 

Students work in groups to create physical models that represent plate motion and plate-mantle interactions at both divergent and convergent plate boundaries. 

 
 
 
 
 

Tuesday 

 
 
 
 

October 17th 

 
 
 
 

 

 Plate Motion Lesson 2.4 

 

 
 
 
 

 

1: Warm-Up (5 min.) 

Students reflect on the weaknesses of the physical models they created in the previous lesson.

 

2: Explaining What Happens at Plate Boundaries (10 min.) 

Students use the Modeling Tool to create cross sections of convergent and divergent plate boundaries. Students add arrows to indicate the direction each plate is moving at each plate boundary. 

 

3: Exploring Plate Boundaries in the Sim (20 min.) 

Students use the Sim to gather evidence about the phenomena that occur at convergent and divergent plate boundaries. They then add this information to their Plate Boundary Comparison Charts. 

 

4: Revising Models of Plate Boundaries (10 min.) 

Students return to their models in order to integrate evidence from the Sim. They add labels to indicate the landforms present at plate boundaries and the plate-mantle interactions that happen at each boundary. The teacher uses this opportunity as an On-the-Fly Assessment of students’ understanding of plate motion and plate-mantle interactions at plate boundaries, as well as their development and use of models. 

 
 
 
 
 

Wednesday 

 
 
 
 

October 18th 

 
 
 
 

Plate Motion Flextention Day 1 

 
 
 
 

 

 This hands-on activity builds on and reinforces students’ understanding of plate motion and the landforms created by different types of plate motion. Students develop their own physical models showing how plate motion can create mountain ranges. Students compare the models they create to how the Plate Motion Sim shows mountains forming during plate motion. Next, students apply their understanding by exploring locations near plate boundaries in Google Earth. Students choose one location and write a short argument about the type of plate boundary they think is at that location, based on landforms they observe. The purpose of this lesson is for students to get more exposure to landforms created by plate motion. 

 
 
 
 
 

Thursday 

 
 
 
 

October 19th 

 
 
 
 

Plate Motion Lesson 2.5 

 
 
 
 

1: Warm-Up (8 min.) 

Students consider the significance of new evidence about the plate boundary between the South American Plate and African Plate. 

 

2: Interpreting Plate Boundary Evidence (17 min.) 

Students evaluate all available evidence about the plate boundary between the South American Plate and African Plate to answer the Chapter 2 Question. The teacher uses this opportunity as an On-the-Fly Assessment of students’ understanding of how patterns are used in the study of geology to better understand the movement of plates. 

 

3: Modeling Plate Motion (20 min.) 

Students use the Modeling Tool to model their current understanding of how the South American Plate and African Plate moved. 

 

4: Homework 

Students use the evidence they’ve collected to write an answer to the Chapter 2 Question. 

 

5: Family Homework Experience (Optional) 

Explaining divergent and convergent plate boundaries to a member of their household supports student learning through shared experiences with family. 

 
 
 
 
 

Friday 

 
 
 
 

October 20th 

 
 
 
 

Plate Motion Lesson 2.6 

 
 
 
 

Students complete a Critical Juncture Assessment (CJ) consisting of 12 multiple-choice questions and 2 written-response questions. The CJ is designed to reveal students’ current levels of understanding about the core content from the unit, and the results are used to place each student at a particular level of the Progress Build (PB). The assessment results indicate students’ progress from the beginning of the unit and are used to group students for differentiated instruction in the next lesson. As with the Pre-Unit Assessment, the CJ includes content beyond what a student is expected to have mastered. Therefore, the CJ is not intended to be used for summative purposes.