January 29th- February 2nd

monday-1.jpg January 29th Natural Selection Lesson 1.3
1: Warm-Up (5 min.)

Students reread an excerpt from the article "The Rough-Skinned Newt" in order to review the idea that individuals in a population can have different traits.

2: Exploring Variation and Distribution in the Sim (20 min.)

Students use the Simulation to reinforce their understanding of trait variation and distribution in populations.

(Teacher Only) Video: Histograms (5 min.)

An animated video helps students understand how histograms simply and accurately convey data about traits in populations.

3: Defining Variation, Distribution, and Generation (5 min.)

Students are introduced to text and visual definitions of the words variationdistribution, and generation.

4: Building Histograms (10 min.)

Students apply their understanding of variation and distribution to building histograms with manipulatives. The teacher uses this opportunity as an On-the-Fly Assessment of students' understanding of variation and distribution through the practice of representing data.

5: Homework

Students gain experience explaining how a histogram shows the traits in a population.

Tuesday-1.jpg January 30th Natural Selection Lesson 1.3 Flextention

 This hands-on activity builds on and reinforces students’ understanding of trait variation
within a population. Students examine some sunflower seeds and observe their traits. They
identify features of the sunflower seeds where there is variation in traits and group the
seeds according to those traits. They then focus on differences in the number of stripes
on the sunflower seed shells and construct histograms to represent the distribution of
stripe numbers. The purpose of this lesson is for students to gain additional experience
with trait variation and to practice constructing histograms.

Wednesday-1.jpg January 31st Natural Selection Lesson 1.4
1: Warm-Up (7 min.)

Students see that the variation and distribution of traits in a population can change over time.

2: Observing Fur Traits and Temperature in the Sim (10 min.)

By investigating an ostrilope population in a cold environment, students learn that adaptive traits help an individual survive in a particular environment, while non-adaptive traits make it harder to survive. The teacher uses this activity as an On-the-Fly Assessment of students' facility with the practice of analyzing and interpreting data.

3: Modeling Changes to the Distribution of Traits (18 min.)

Students create a model to show their ideas about why the distribution of a trait can change.

4: Testing Predictions in the Sim (10 min.)

Through investigating a population with low variation in a cold environment, students learn that changes in distribution of traits are determined by the traits present in the population.

5: Homework

Students read about a few organisms that live in the same environment as rough-skinned newts in order to apply their understanding of variation, traits, and changes in trait distribution.

thursday-1.jpg February 1st Natural Selection Lesson 1.5

 

1: Warm-Up (5 min.)

Students review how to describe the distribution of traits in a population by looking at new evidence about the poisonous newt population.

2: Investigating Adaptive Traits in the Sim (25 min.)

Students investigate if yellow is always an adaptive trait by observing yellow ostrilopes in yellow environments with and without carnithons.

3: Modeling Trait Distribution in Thornpalms (15 min.)

Students apply their understanding of why the distribution of traits in a population changes by making a prediction about the water-storage trait in thornpalms. The teacher uses this opportunity as an On-the-Fly Assessment of students' understanding of how the distribution of traits in a population changes when environmental factors make it more or less likely for organisms with certain traits to survive.

4: Homework

Students test their predictions from their Modeling Tools in the Simulation.

friday-1.jpg February 2nd Natural Selection Lesson 1.6

 

1: Warm-Up (10 min.)

Students explore a common alternate conception and use their understanding of adaptive traits to explain why it is wrong.

2: Write and Share: Changes in Populations (20 min.)

Students participate in the Write and Share routine to practice using essential vocabulary and to apply their understanding about what makes the distribution of traits in a population change.

3: Explaining Changes in the Newt Population (15 min.)

Students examine histograms of the newt population and use what they have learned to explain why the newts in the population became more poisonous over time. The teacher uses this activity as an On-the-Fly Assessment of students' understanding of the crosscutting concept of Cause and Effect.

4: Self-Assessment (Optional)

Students check their understanding of key content in the unit, and are given a chance to reflect on additional questions they have about natural selection in the newt population.